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Socializing and Engagement: An Important Part of Memory Care

Avalon offers a unique experience for each member of our community.  Each resident has the opportunity to participate in fun and varied social and recreational programing.  Residents enjoy exercise, gardening, baking, games, and other organized events on a regular basis.  Robust activities help maintain communication skills, increase self-worth and enhance or maintain overall health. These opportunities are just one way we keep our residents engaged and participating in life.  Our communities are designed for all individuals with memory issues and offer private apartments that can be decorated with your furniture and personal touches.  By providing a welcoming, fun, engaging environment we ensure it feels like home. Avalon offers memory care for individuals who have dementia, suffered a stroke, Alzheimer’s and many other types of memory concerns.  For information on Avalon and how we can help or to get your questions answered please, call us today at (214) 752-7050.

By |2018-09-19T14:03:37+00:00September 19th, 2018|Categories: Alzheimer's, Dementia, Memory Care|0 Comments

Dietary Challenges for Individuals with Memory Loss and Alzheimer’s

Avalon Memory Care provides comprehensive care for all of our residents. Without continuous care, many individuals with memory loss or dementia may struggle to get the nutrients their bodies desperately need. Our Avalon Memory Care team is ready to help you and your loved one with these challenges. Many memory care providers report that individuals who have been diagnosed with memory loss struggle to keep up their appetites. While some individuals may be simply less hungry, there is often an underlying reason they are not eating as much. For example, he or she may no longer recognize the food on the plate or may have lost a sharp sense of smell or taste. At Avalon Memory Care we work with you to insure your loved one is still getting enough nutrients and food.  Our locations offer three home-cooked meals every day.  To deal with poor appetite, we make sure to offer various options and snack and shakes as supplements. If you would like a home-like environment, compassionate care, and superior health services for your loved one with Alzheimer’s, look no further than Avalon Memory Care. Find out more about our locations by calling us at (214) 752-7050.

By |2018-09-13T08:19:57+00:00September 13th, 2018|Categories: Alzheimer's, Dementia|0 Comments

Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias: Myth vs. Fact

It’s important to know the facts about Alzheimer’s because it is a progressive disease — meaning it worsens over time. Knowing the signs, and being able to tell fact from fiction, can provide clues to help you or your loved one get the support you need sooner. Here are some common misconceptions about Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Myth: Memory loss is just a part of aging for everyone. Fact: While it’s true some short-term memory function declines as we age, Alzheimer's is more than occasional memory loss. When someone has Alzheimer’s, their brain cells malfunction and eventually die. When this happens, the person may forget the names of friends and family members or even how to get home. Myth: Alzheimer’s and dementia are pretty much the same thing. Fact: While Alzheimer’s disease is a form of dementia, not all dementia is Alzheimer’s. Only a doctor may be able to tell the difference. Sometimes similar problems are caused by medication, vitamin deficiencies, other types of dementia or related conditions, and some can be reversed with treatment. Myth: There are treatments to prevent the progression of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. Fact: There is currently no treatment to cure, delay or stop the progression of these diseases. But there are medications for memory loss, and other treatments that can be helpful in managing cognitive and behavioral symptoms. Researchers continue to look for treatments to improve quality of life for individuals with dementia or Alzheimer’s. Myth: Only elderly people can get Alzheimer’s and other dementias. Fact: Younger- or early-onset Alzheimer's can strike people as young as 30 years old. It is estimated 200,000 of the over 5 million people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s are under 65 years old. Myth: Alzheimer’s can be caused by aluminum cans or [...]

By |2018-09-12T10:57:48+00:00September 12th, 2018|Categories: Alzheimer's, Dementia, Memory Care|0 Comments

Habilitation Therapy for Alzheimer’s

Habilitation is a unique approach to caring for individuals with Alzheimer’s that focuses on each person’s remaining capacities. This approach recognizes some of the most critical insights about the condition, including the fact that an individual’s emotions remain adult even when his or her verbal abilities have declined. This video provides an informative look at how habilitation can be used to provide more effective treatment for people who have the disease. At Avalon Memory Care, we can offer the safe and professional mental health services that your family is looking for to support your loved one with Alzheimer’s. If you would like to learn more about our award-winning program, call (214) 752-7050.

By |2018-09-11T11:24:34+00:00January 30th, 2018|Categories: Alzheimer's|0 Comments

Aluminum and Alzheimer’s: Dispelling the Myth

Despite the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease, there are many popular misconceptions about the illness and its origins. One of the most commonly heard myths, for instance, is that Alzheimer’s is linked to contact with objects made of aluminum, such as pots, pans, and even foil. While researchers did once suspect that there might be such a link, no evidence has ever developed showing that aluminum has any negative effects on the body. While the factors that lead to Alzheimer’s are still being studied, there is no reason to believe that handling aluminum will make you susceptible to the disease. At Avalon Memory Care, we always put the well-being of our residents first. If your loved one comes to stay at one of our assisted living locations in Dallas, Arlington, or Houston, you can count on us to treat them like a member of our own family. If you have any questions for us, call (214) 752-7050.

By |2018-09-11T16:29:31+00:00January 30th, 2018|Categories: Alzheimer's|0 Comments

Hope For the Future: Emerging Alzheimer’s Research

According to the latest statistics, as many as 5.5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease, and its prevalence is only expected to rise in the next few decades. At the same time, however, research into treatments for the condition is accelerating. With every passing year, we move a little further down the road toward the goal of a universal treatment for this nearly universal ailment. What treatments currently exist for Alzheimer’s? Today, individuals who have Alzheimer’s have access to five medications that have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. These treatments are donepezil, galantamine, memantine, rivastigmine, and a combination of donepezil and memantine. These treatments work by blocking the process by which Alzheimer’s destroys the neurons in a person’s brain. What is the goal of the treatments being developed? The treatments that are available now can provide relief for Alzheimer’s symptoms, but they do not treat the condition itself. The focus of much of the current research into Alzheimer’s is the actual disease, and the hope is that eventually we will be able to slow down its progress in individuals. What are the most promising areas of research for future treatments? As we have learned to better understand the brain, we have moved closer to a better understanding of how Alzheimer’s damages it. This has helped researchers identify some treatments that can work against its effects. Some of the treatments being studied are Aducanumab, which can slow the growth of plaques in the brain; AADvac1, which can spark an immune system reaction against the proteins that harm neurons; and Sargramostim, a medication currently used for treating leukemia, but which may have promise as a treatment for Alzheimer’s. Avalon Memory Care provides [...]

By |2018-09-11T12:52:19+00:00January 30th, 2018|Categories: Alzheimer's|0 Comments

What To Do If You Think Your Mom Has Alzheimer’s

A suspicion of a problem with a loved one’s health should be acted upon. It is difficult to bring up the subject of Alzheimer’s with an aging loved one, but doing so is necessary to ensure that he or she gets the proper care. If you suspect that your mom needs Alzheimer’s care, the first step is to keep track of your observances. Keep a written record of memory loss problems. Memory loss is the hallmark characteristic of Alzheimer’s, but everyone experiences it from time to time. It is when memory loss is significant enough to impair everyday functioning that doctors begin to suspect someone needs dementia care. Look for the following issues: Problems managing money Poor judgment Forgetting to go to appointments Forgetting how to navigate to a frequently visited destination Repeating herself frequently Talk to your mom’s doctor. Adult children are often unsure about the extent to which they can involve themselves with an elderly parent’s healthcare. Everyone in the U.S. has the legal right to keep their medical records private. However, it is not a violation to meet with your mom’s doctor, with or without her presence. If you are not ready to discuss your concerns with your mom yet, you can share them with her doctor. The doctor can consider whether your observations about your mom’s memory loss warrant referring her to a neurologist for screening. Discuss the idea of getting screened for Alzheimer’s. It is common for older parents to resist the idea of getting tested for Alzheimer’s. If your mom is among them, try saying something like this, “You are right, mom. I am sure there is nothing wrong. I think getting screened would give us both some peace [...]

By |2018-09-11T12:54:32+00:00January 15th, 2018|Categories: Alzheimer's|0 Comments

Natural Disaster Preparedness for Families Affected by Alzheimer’s

Natural disasters can affect any state in the country, but many families are unprepared to deal with things like evacuation, sheltering in place, and handling the aftermath. If your family has a loved one in memory care, it is even more critical to have a disaster plan in place. First, know the types of disasters that could affect your area. Families in Dallas may encounter heat waves, flash floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, and even the occasional earthquake. You can use this information to find solutions that will keep your loved one safe. Contact the assisted living location. If your loved one is receiving continuous care at an assisted living location, get in touch with the administrative staff to inquire about how natural disasters are handled. Find out what you need to do if an evacuation order is issued for your loved one’s area. Will the residents be relocated as a group, or will your family take the resident to a safer location? Identify evacuation destinations. If you will be evacuating your loved one, you will need to handle the agitation and confusion that may accompany sudden changes in routine and surroundings. It is preferable to evacuate to a family member’s or friend’s home in a safer zone, since evacuation shelters are not ideal environments for individuals with Alzheimer’s. Alternatively, your region may have special needs shelters available. Contact the appropriate municipal agency to find out where these shelters are, and to register in advance, if need be. Assemble the emergency supplies your loved one needs. Every family should have basic emergency supplies available, including potable water, non-perishable food, flashlights, extra batteries, and a battery-operated radio. When a loved one needs continuous care because of Alzheimer’s disease, [...]

By |2018-09-11T16:24:10+00:00December 8th, 2017|Categories: Alzheimer's|0 Comments

What You Need to Know About Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials

After being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, you have a lot of decisions to make. You will need to make arrangements for long-term care, and consider your treatment options. Alzheimer’s disease is not currently curable, although top-notch memory care locations can support the quality of life and overall health of the residents. It might be years before you need to move to an assisted living location, as Alzheimer’s progresses slowly. In the meantime, consider becoming a participant in a clinical trial to advance scientific knowledge of this devastating disease. Your participation may play a part in finding a cure someday. Purpose of Clinical Trials The primary purpose of clinical trials is to find new treatment options for the disease. These may include drugs intended to slow the progression of brain damage, halt the brain damage entirely, or manage the symptoms more effectively. During any clinical trial, the researchers focus on the treatment’s safety profile and effectiveness. Only drugs that are proven effective and have a favorable safety profile can be approved for use in the U.S. Types of Clinical Trials There is a slight difference between clinical trials and clinical studies. Clinical trials only test the effectiveness and safety of medications or other medical interventions. Clinical studies involve people too, but they may research other aspects of the disease. Diagnostic studies look for more effective and accessible ways of diagnosing Alzheimer’s as early as possible. Prevention studies are aimed at looking for new ways of preventing Alzheimer’s. And quality of life studies examine ways of improving quality of life for people with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers. Participants in Clinical Trials People who join clinical trials after a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease generally do so because they recognize [...]

By |2018-09-11T12:49:34+00:00November 24th, 2017|Categories: Alzheimer's|0 Comments

Core Elements of Quality Alzheimer’s Care

As time passes, Alzheimer’s disease erodes a person’s memories and robs him or her of a self-identity. Regardless of the extent to which an individual is disabled and dependent because of this disease, he or she is just as deserving of respect and compassion as anyone else. The following core elements of high-quality Alzheimer’s support can serve as an assessment tool for families who are looking for an assisted living home for their loved ones. Soothing Environment Large, institutional buildings are not appropriate settings for individuals with Alzheimer’s. The harsh glare of overly bright lights, maze of hallways, and décor befitting a hospital only serve to confuse and overwhelm these people. Instead, seniors should be able to live comfortably within a specialized memory care location that mimics a normal home as much as possible. A soothing environment allows residents to live out their days with the dignity they deserve. Meaningful Activities A person’s work, interests and hobbies give him or her a sense of purpose. Meaningful activities are not merely “busy work,” but rather they are any activities that a resident genuinely finds joy in. High-quality Alzheimer’s care locations give their residents daily opportunities for social connectivity and mental stimulation. Family Relationships No family should ever need an appointment to visit their loved one. High-quality assisted living homes maintain an open door policy for their residents’ family and friends. Families should feel free to visit as often as they wish to enjoy the company of their loved ones in a peaceful setting, or to share a meal together. Caregiver Engagement One of the most important elements of quality care is the caregiver. Memory caregivers should be highly trained and skillful individuals, but also genuinely compassionate [...]

By |2018-09-11T12:09:07+00:00November 9th, 2017|Categories: Alzheimer's|0 Comments